Robert Frost Poems

Compare and Contrast the Poems

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

‘Out, out' is a poem written by Robert Frost who tells the story of a boy that had his life taken from him in an extremely upsetting circumstance. In comparison to this, "Disabled" by Wilfred Owen portrays a young man that has left part of himself behind in the war. Both poems assert ideas that insinuate brevity along with fragility of both characters in the poem, in addition to the essence that life will go on, that a singular life such as those of the characters are insignificant on a universal scale as when the young soldier from "Disabled" returned from war he is forgotten and the boy from ‘Out, out' where the people around him moved on even when he had just died. "Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more". This is undeniably a reference from Shakespeare's Macbeth that illustrates the image of a wavering candlelight that is fragile and brief. It also recalls the spirit of life, which at the same time is similarly brief and easily snatched away. Unlike ‘Disabled', ‘Out, out'

In Robert Frost's ‘Out, out-‘, the tragic accident does not place the boy at fault. On the other hand, Owen's ‘Disabled' was partially placed the young man at fault. The fact that it was not the boy's fault in ‘Out, out-‘ encourages pity within the audience because they know that there was nothing that could have been done to stop it. Similarly, in ‘Disabled', the young man is brainwashed with propaganda to believe that the war is grand and fun. This encourages the audience to feel pity for the young man as he believed that the war would not be able to harm him. The despair induced in the reader at the child's unexpected death and the soldier's erroneous assumption that war glorious is a prime feature of both ‘Disabled' and ‘Out, out' The soldier had believed that war would be magnificent, but he, however, returns home unheroic and shunned by other "whole" people. His perception of life and his view of war have been affected radically by his wrong choice. The young soldier had initially been caught up in an elaborate dream with ‘jewelled hilts for daggers in plaid socks' and of "smart salutes, and care of arms; and leave, and pay arrears." And yet, as he comes to understand, these are all illusions he managed to trick and commit himself to.

The wonderful war image that he had formed in his childhood is soon changed and his high hopes contrast with the short, blunt reality where he will ‘spend a few sick years in Institutes, and do what the rules consider wise'. We, as the audience, feel pity and sympathy for him as his anticipation is let down and he is ultimately disappointed. Furthermore, there is a shocking realization that all he had held true as a child when he "liked a blood smear down his leg" and "thought he'd better join" was proved to be wrong by his experiences and the reader feels the urge to give him some small measure of comfort that he is deprived of now due to his deformities and he "noticed how the women's eyes passed fro him to the strong men that were whole." Similarly, in ‘Out, out' the reader feels anguish at the painful way the child must have died. The saw ‘as if to prove saws knew what supper meant, leapt out at the boy's hand' This is an example of vivid imagery that allows us to feel the events taking place and to understand all the feelings and sensory overload in the scene, and therefore we suffer along with the child. Some forewarning of his death is evident with the repetition of "snarled and rattled" hinting at the impending death and the pain that is likely to be experienced, which produces a more powerful reaction from the reader, who feels a measure of grief and empathy when they realize something and is about to occur whereas, ironically, the boy is still unknowingly completing his normal routine, unsuspecting. His terrified, angry and panicky voice when he screams "Don't let him sister!", in addition, he makes the reader feel increased empathy and pity for his plight. As he to such an extent that he is unable to organize his thought and feels pure terror. He will lose his family as well as miss out on all the beautiful things in life that he yet to understand and feel –such as the calm vista at the start of the poem and all the ‘sweet-scented stuff' as well as the ‘five mountain ranges…

Under the sunset far into Vermont'. The persona's strength of feeling and compassion, that he wished they might have ‘called it a day…to please the boy' deepens and intensifies the regret and wretchedness of the scene because it suggests that I the day had ended early then the boy might not have died so brutally. The melancholy and longing for what could have been is highlighted and this makes the death the most poignant moment of the poem. Both Robert Frost and Wilfred Owen use the fact that the main characters in both the poems are young. This is shown through multiple references to the character being a boy in ‘Out, Out-‘. An example of this is: "Leaped out at the boy's hand" and "Doing a man's work, though a child at heart-". Similarly, in ‘Disabled', the character is shown as young when the army recruitment officers allowed him into the army: "Smiling they wrote his lie: aged 19 years". This encourages sympathy as both the characters are only young. Unlike ‘Disabled', ‘Out, out-‘ uses personification to make the tragic accident almost seem like murder. Personification is shown in the texts first line: "The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard" and lines 15,16: "As if to prove saws knew what supper meant, leapt out at the boy's hand, or seemed to leap-". This encourages sympathy for the boy because murder is much worse than a tragic accident. In ‘Disabled' the text states "poured it down shell-holes till veins ran dry" – This could mean that "it" would be the characters life, and how he was originally full of life, but now he has nothing and is left bare.

Owen describes this loss of life as a loss of "half his life" in which he will have to spend the rest "in institutes, isolated from the community and that of his past". Similarly to this, ‘Out, out' uses "As he swung towards them holding up the hand Half in appeal, but half as if to keep the life from spilling". This is talking, much like ‘Disabled', about blood leaving their bodies, and depicting blood as the life essence of the two people.

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Out Out Comparison Against Disabled

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

‘Out, out’ is a poem written by Robert Frost who tells the story of a boy that had his life taken from him in an extremely upsetting circumstance. In comparison to this, “Disabled” by Wilfred Owen portrays a young man that has left part of himself behind in the war. Both poems assert ideas that insinuate brevity along with fragility of both characters in the poem, in addition to the essence that life will go on, that a singular life such as those of the characters are insignificant on a universal scale as when the young soldier from “Disabled” returned from war he is forgotten and the boy from ‘Out, out’ where the people around him moved on even when he had just died. “Out, out, brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more”. This is undeniably a reference from Shakespeare’s Macbeth that illustrates the image of a wavering candlelight that is fragile and brief. It also recalls the spirit of life, which at the same time is similarly brief and easily snatched away. Unlike ‘Disabled’, ‘Out, out’ In Robert Frost’s ‘Out, out-‘, the tragic accident does not place the boy at fault. On the other hand, Owen’s ‘Disabled’ was partially placed the young man at fault. The fact that it was not the boy’s fault in ‘Out, out-‘ encourages pity within the audience because they know that there was nothing that could have been done to stop it.

Similarly, in ‘Disabled’, the young man is brainwashed with propaganda to believe that the war is grand and fun. This encourages the audience to feel pity for the young man as he believed that the war would not be able to harm him. The despair induced in the reader at the child’s unexpected death and the soldier’s erroneous assumption that war is a glorious thing is a prime feature of both ‘Disabled’ and ‘Out, out’. The soldier had believed that going to war would be magnificent and jolly, but he, however, returns home unheroic and shunned by the people around him. His perception of life and his view of war have been affected radically by his wrong choice.

The young soldier had initially been caught up in an elaborate dream with ‘jewelled hilts for daggers in plaid socks’ and of “smart salutes, and care of arms; and leave, and pay arrears.” And yet, as he comes to understand, these are all illusions he managed to trick and commit himself to. The wonderful war image that he had formed in his childhood is soon changed and his high hopes contrast with the short, blunt reality where he will ‘spend a few sick years in Institutes, and do what the rules consider wise’. We, as the audience, feel pity and sympathy for him as his anticipation is let down and he is ultimately disappointed. Furthermore, there is a shocking realization that all he had held true as a child when he “liked a blood smear down his leg” and “thought he’d better join” was proved to be wrong by his experiences and the reader feels the urge to give him some small measure of comfort that he is deprived of now due to his deformities and he “noticed how the women’s eyes passed fro him to the strong men that were whole.

Similarly, in ‘Out, out’ the reader feels anguish at the painful way the child must have died. The saw ‘as if to prove saws knew what supper meant, leapt out at the boy’s hand’ This is an example of vivid imagery that allows us to feel the events taking place and to understand all the feelings and sensory overload in the scene, and therefore we suffer along with the child. Some forewarning of his death is evident with the repetition of “snarled and rattled” hinting at the impending death and the pain that is likely to be experienced, which produces a more powerful reaction from the reader, who feels a measure of grief and empathy when they realize something and is about to occur whereas, ironically, the boy is still unknowingly completing his normal routine, unsuspecting. His terrified, angry and panicky voice when he screams “Don’t let him sister!”, in addition, he makes the reader feel increased empathy and pity for his plight. As he to such an extent that he is unable to organize his thought and feels pure terror. He will lose his family as well as miss out on all the beautiful things in life that he yet to understand and feel –such as the calm vista at the start of the poem and all the ‘sweet-scented stuff’ as well as the ‘five mountain ranges…. Under the sunset far into Vermont’.

The persona’s strength of feeling and compassion, that he wished they might have ‘called it a day…to please the boy’ deepens and intensifies the regret and wretchedness of the scene because it suggests that I the day had ended early then the boy might not have died so brutally. The melancholy and longing for what could have been are highlighted and this makes the death the most poignant moment of the poem. Both Robert Frost and Wilfred Owen use the fact that the main characters in both the poems are young. This is shown through multiple references to the character being a boy in ‘Out, Out-‘. An example of this is: “Leaped out at the boy’s hand” and “Doing a man’s work, though a child at heart-” Similarly, in ‘Disabled’, the character is shown as young when the army recruitment officers allowed him into the army: “Smiling they wrote his lie: aged 19 years”. This encourages sympathy as both the characters are only young. Unlike ‘Disabled’, ‘Out, out-‘ uses personification to make the tragic accident almost seem like murder. Personification is shown in the texts first line: “The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard” and lines 15,16: “As if to prove saws knew what supper meant, leapt out at the boy’s hand, or seemed to leap-“. This encourages sympathy for the boy because murder is much worse than a tragic accident. In ‘Disabled’ the text states “poured it down shell-holes till veins ran dry” – This could mean that “it” would be the characters life, and how he was originally full of life, but now he has nothing and is left bare. Owen describes this loss of life as a loss of “half his life” in which he will have to spend the rest “in institutes, isolated from the community and that of his past”.

Similarly to this, ‘Out, out’ uses “As he swung towards them holding up the hand Half in appeal, but half as if to keep the life from spilling”. This is talking, much like ‘Disabled’, about blood leaving their bodies, and depicting blood as the life essence of the two people.

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Representing of Concepts of Meaning, Loss and Morality in Robert Frost Poems

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

Throughout both poems, Frost approaches the theme of mortality both directly and indirectly, exploring not only the random, often violent nature of death, but even its dangerous appeal. ‘Out Out —’ deals with the former, choosing to question the romanticism often attributed to it through portraying the violent, accidental death of a young child. Undoubtedly influenced by the mass slaughter witnessed throughout the First World War, Frost’s portrayal of a narrator seeking to apply blame even to inanimate objects – such as the chainsaw – provides a metaphor for the search for meaning and direction when both are absent. Despite opting for a more structured, regular form (in terms of both verse and metre), ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’ approaches death in a similar manner, developing an overriding sense of isolation which mirrors the response of the community in ‘Out Out —’ to the child’s death. Certainty and uncertainty are frequently juxtaposed throughout both poems, undermining any sense of assured knowledge and laying significant emphasis on humanity’s total powerlessness in the face of its own mortality. Crucially, however, whilst ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’ does not attempt to ‘explain’ death to any extent, it suggests an acceptance of it that is not seen in the attempts of ‘Out Out —‘ to come to terms with the random, meaningless nature of mortality. In this way, therefore, the former can easily be seen as a development of the latter, marking Frost’s increasing acceptance of – even longing for – death. In their refusal to romanticise death, both poems choose to undermine the romantic movement of the late 19th century, instead reflecting an era of modernism in which, after the first world war had shaken much of the belief in religious and conservative values, the structures which underpinned contemporary society were beginning to deteriorate.

Through the use of a first person narrator, Frost gives both poems a distinctly human perspective, allowing him to fully explore humanity’s relationship with death: ‘Leaped out at the boy’s hand, or seemed to leap, / He must have given the hand.’ Here, in ‘Out Out —’, Frost’s use of personification in the repeated ‘leap’ gives the chainsaw some kind of malevolent intent – as if the the boy is a victim of an external force. Furthermore, the frequently repeated, strongly onomatopoeic phrase ‘snarled and rattled’ contains further connotations of violence, once again portraying the chainsaw as an intentionally harmful living creature. However, this attempt to divide the ‘good’ and the ‘bad’ – the ‘victim’ from the ‘assailant’ – is clearly misguided, with the contrast between the certain connotations of ‘must’ and the doubtful ‘seemed’ serving to question the narrator’s ability to distinguish truth from invention. His fruitless attempts to apportion blame only emphasise the indiscriminate, often random nature of mortality; it is through this sense of randomness that death loses the higher meaning or significance that was frequently applied to it by the romantic poets. Frost’s use of a singular, unstructured stanza, particularly when combined with the lack of regular rhyme and metre, serves to reinforce the lack of stability and order seen throughout the poem, whilst the phrase ‘dropped stove length sticks of wood’ contributes strongly to the overall sense of purposelessness – he declines to mention the specific purpose of the action, focusing only on its immediate result (the somewhat vague ‘stove length sticks of wood’). The impersonal, almost passive connotations of ‘dropped’ again remove any sense of positive progress. The ideas of purposeless violence found throughout the poem, set against the backdrop of a fruitless search for moral accountability, most likely has its roots in the first world war; although the poem is not a direct metaphor for human conflict (its themes of powerlessness in the face of mortality are too universal to be limited to just ‘war’) the poem is perhaps an example of the first world war’s effect on attitudes towards death, bringing the fragility of human life into focus.

Similarly, Frost incorporates ideas of uncertainty into ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’: ‘Whose woods these are I think I know. / His house is in the village though’. Here, in the opening line of the poem, the direct juxtaposition of ‘I think’ to ‘I know’ again undermines the extent of human ‘knowledge’, stressing the narrator’s uncertainty as to the nature of mortality – unsubstantiated ideas (‘think’) are placed equal to factual ‘knowledge’ (‘know’). However, the owner of the ‘house’ is perhaps intended to be the personification of death, with the immediate connotations of ‘village’ suggesting a closer, more direct relationship with death than that seen in ‘Out Out —’, where mortality is portrayed as a detached, entirely arbitrary entity. The use of a regular rhyme scheme and stanza structure, combined with the consistent use of iambic tetrameter, contributes to a calmer, more contented tone of voice; written 8 years after ‘Out Out —’, this is perhaps indicative of an ageing Frost’s own increasing willingness to embrace mortality. Whilst both poems position humanity in a position of total subservience to death, it could be argued that, in each, Frost handles this position in different ways – where ‘Out Out —’ comments more upon the meaningless, often violent nature of mortality, ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’ explores its dark attraction, describing the woods as ‘lovely, dark and deep’. Perhaps symbolic of death, the simultaneously alluring and threatening connotations of ‘dark and deep’ serve to clarify his feelings on mortality, expressing an odd desire for it without questioning his total ignorance of its nature.

However, through the links they draw between mortality and the natural world, both poems choose to further subvert the style of the romantic movement that dominated in previous years: ‘And from there those that lifted eyes could count / Five mountain ranges one behind the other / under the sunset far into Vermont’. Here, in ‘Out Out —’, Frost’s use of assonance, combined with the repeated enjambment, lays heavy emphasis on the expanse of the scenery, painting a vivid picture of natural beauty which, on the surface, would appear to be a highly romantic image. However, the connotations of heavy physical labour in ‘lifted’ contrast to the relatively simple act of looking upwards, highlighting the extent to which the workers are detached from the natural world and, by extension, the substantial effort required for them to embrace it. This preoccupation with human ‘affairs’ is a theme that runs throughout the poem, extending further into Frost’s presentation of mortality – unable to comprehend or even acknowledge the natural world, humankind is left at the mercy of death. The connotations of subservience in ‘under the sunset’ subtly reinforce this overriding sense of powerlessness and insignificance. The total inability of human kind to comprehend the nature of mortality is highlighted by the boy’s ‘rueful laugh’ in reaction to his severed hand, with the light-hearted connotations of ‘laugh’ belying the seriousness of the wound to lay emphasis on the boy’s confusion and disbelief. However in ‘stopping by woods on a snowy evening’, Frost focuses less on his ignorance of death and more on a growing acceptance of it, with the connotations of bedding in ‘downy flake’ highlighting the attractiveness of the environment. Much like in ‘Out Out —’, Frost uses the setting of the poem to develop his presentation of mortality, in this case turning an apparently barren, nihilistic environment into a relatively accommodating one. This could be seen to mimic the idea that death – a previously alien and hostile concept – has become decidedly more attractive. The continuing theme of powerlessness is also explored in the poem, with the speaker clearly placed in the position of a helpless observer in the phrase ‘watch his woods fill up with snow’. However, there is an element of defiance here – by trespassing on death’s territory (the idea of possession is emphasised by the personal pronoun in ‘his woods’) he is demonstrating both his lack of fear and ability to acknowledge the inevitability of death, even without necessarily understanding it. This is a substantially more optimistic view of mortality than that presented in ‘Out Out —’, once again developing a strong tone of acceptance and contentment.

As both poems progress, however, it is increasingly clear that they place humanity in a position of total helplessness. Frost continually takes this point further, highlighting the descent of human progression into an act of helplessness in the face of mortality: ‘no more to build on there. And they, since they / were not the one dead, turned to their affairs’. Here, in ‘Out Out —‘, the vague, impersonal use of ‘they’ lays heavy emphasis on the total lack of intimacy or affection, highlighting the ability of death to subvert the prized traditional value of family and, by extension, civilised society as a whole. In fact, the everyday connotations of ‘affairs’ seems to point the finger directly at civilised society itself, portraying the day to day existence of human beings as a sort of distraction from the reality of death and, in this way, as the embodiment of human powerlessness. The total lack of emotion in ‘build on’, combined with the shortened sentence structure, creates an empty, unfeeling tone, again representing society’s dismissive attitude towards human life – the ‘progress’ of society takes precedent. These ideas can be seen clearly reflected in the events of the First World War, where territorial gains were given a higher value than human life.

Equally, in ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’, Frost portrays the relationship between death and social responsibility: ‘But I have promises to keep, / and miles to go before I sleep, / and miles to go before I sleep’. Here, the repeated line ‘and miles to go before I sleep’ creates a sense of dogged, almost endless continuation, presenting mortality as a welcome rest from the day to day repetition of life. It is only his ‘promises’ that keep him from embracing death immediately, suggesting that the only motivation for human existence is to honour commitments for the future, as opposed to the present moment. The use of continuous rhyme here helps to add to the sense of constant repetition. It is clear, then, that whilst both poems present mortality as being totally out of human hands, they choose to deal with this information differently, with Frost’s early poem focusing mainly on the random, inexplicable nature of death, whilst ’Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’ marks the poet’s gradual acceptance of his inevitable fate.

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Analysis of the Life of Robert Frost – One of the Most Interesting Poets for All Times

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

The poet that has often captivated the minds of many with his writings on nature, at least for my case this is true. I find Robert Frost to be one of the most interesting poets in all time, he seemed to have had a mind for the things of nature almost as if he was connected to the elements. The way he wrote about these settings in nature would make anyone think that he was present in the event almost spiritually. He suffered many losses during his life but somehow seemed to hold onto life with the most colorful view I’ve ever seen anybody have on life. I will continue walking through the life of Robert Frost.

Robert Frost spent his childhood in San Francisco, until his father died of tuberculosis, Frost then with his mother and sibling to Lawrence, Massachusetts so his mother could teach there. In 1890 Frost published his first poem based on William Prescott’s “History of the conquest of Mexico”. He also published poems in his high schools’ bulletin. He enrolled in Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1892, and later at Harvard University in Boston, though he never earned a formal degree. After leaving school he had several jobs such as Teacher, Cobbler, and editor of the Lawrence sentinel. His first published work “My Butterfly”, appeared on November 8, 1894 in the New York Newspaper the Independent.

He married Elinor Miriam White who was a valedictorian honors in high school, she was a major inspiration for his poetry until her death in 1938. They moved to England in 1912, after they tried and failed at farming in New Hampshire. It was abroad that frost met and was influenced by such contemporary British poets like Edward Thomas, Rupert Brooke, and Robert Graves. While he was there, he also established friendship with poet Ezra pound, who helped promote and publish his work.

When he returned to The United States in 1915, he had published two full-length collections, A boy’s will Henry Holt and company, 1913 and North of Boston Henry Holt and company, 1914. By the 1920s he was the most celebrated poet in America, and with each new book his fame and honor increased including Pulitzer Prizes. He was a consultant in poetry to the library of congress from 1958-1959. He was thought of as a poet of traditional verse forms and metrics who remained steadfastly aloof from the poetics movements and fashions of his time. He was considered an author searching and often meditated heavily on dark things surrounding universal themes. He was an artist mixing in layers of ambiguity and irony.

He is often thought of as working with a puritan ethic being a lyricist of nature voicing the many things to the world others didn’t think where that important. He became a national celebrity, a great performer in the tradition of that earlier expert of the literary vernacular, Mark Twain. He was such an inspiration to many he became consumed by his surroundings and thoughts. Just like many other authors when something was getting to him, he would put it down on paper to keep from dwelling on it. He was ahead of his time while others went crazy with lunacy, he kept himself sane by freeing his mind of what drove so many people crazy.

He had many life experiences to draw from, he lost a wife, children, and siblings. Mental illness ran in his family he was a true hero overcoming his own demons and having to endure so much hurt he endured these hardships to teach a generation how they might deal with the same problems that he faced in his life. He was comfortable with what he knew drawing on the traditions of poets yet jumping out of boundaries creating a way of his own standing out against the gray.

In his poem “nothing Gold can stay” he is basically saying that nothings perfect but only for a moment life happens. Everything is constantly changing the heartbeat of the world around us stops for nothing, but maybe just for a second everything in life has a phase where everything is just right. In” stopping by woods on a snowy evening” He tells of the mystery and beauty that is in the forest, but we are too busy to stop and look at what is around us. We are too busy in this world to realize how precious our surroundings are, we are to blessed to even take a minute and breath it in.

Robert Frost was much more of an artist than a poet he knew what aspects in life to capture in his writings he knew what was important before many of his peers could even realize what was precious. He was a marvel of an author captivated the minds of many in a time there was so much hurt. He was so much more than people gave him credit for he knew what he wanted in life, and he didn’t let his problems stop him from reaching out and taking it. Robert frost was a poet that knew how to put things down on paper far superior to his counterparts.

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An Analysis of Imagery and Setting in Robert Frost’s Home Burial

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

Robert Frost is considered one of the greatest American poets of the 20th century. His writings have been lauded for their pastoral imagery, emotional depth, and their masterful use of America colloquialism. Frost’s poem, Home Burial, is an exquisite combination of these elements, exploring the depths of emotional suffering and its effect on marriage. The poem is framed in the form of a deeply emotional dialogue between husband and wife over the coldness of their marriage in the wake of the death of their young son. Home Burial is Robert Frost’s semi-autobiographical retelling of his youngest son’s death and the affect this tragic event had on his own marriage. Robert Frost’s poem, Home Burial, uses the setting and exquisite imagery in order to develop the relationship between Amy and the husband.

The poem Home Burial takes place in the rural New England country side. The setting is an important part of understanding the poem, as the New England tradition of home burial takes a prominent role in the poem’s story. Back in the 1800’s, it was common for deceased family members to be buried near the family home. Since homes usually stayed within the family, small cemeteries spanning several generations were a common sight. At the very beginning of Home Burial, Amy is looking outside of the window, seeing the small family graveyard that lies on the outskirts of the house. Her unnamed husband describes this small plot of land as, “the place where my people can be found”, confirming that this is indeed a family cemetery.

Amy is very much distraught by the sight of the graveyard, while her husband is more comfortable with the idea. As she looks at the graves with a terror stricken face, Amy’s husband tells her, “Broad shouldered little slabs there in the sunlight on the hill side. We haven’t to mind those.” The way the husband speaks about the graves tells the reader of the husband’s familiarity with the sight of the tombstones, and how its a normal sight for him. This may imply that Amy is actually a foreigner, and thus it may be disturbing to her to have a constant reminder of the dead. If she came from the city, this would explain why Amy finds burying her own child to be a disturbing event (Burns 11). This implies that Amy is not very used to the New England tradition of home burial.

When Home Burial was written in 1914, child mortality rates were extremely high. It was common for children under the age of five years old to die due to disease. The poem presented a very real fear to the early 20th century reader, that they may indeed have to bury their young child. The poem’s setting gives the reader insight into how the different characters in the poem experience their loss. The husband had already seen three generations of family buried in the same plot he had buried his child, so the reader can surmise that he is intimately familiar with death. Amy on the other hand is mortified by the constant reminder of the graves.

The New England setting of the poem helps to make apparent the differences between the two characters, which sets the conflict in the rest of the work. This parallels Robert Frost’s own experience when he had to bury his youngest child Elliot at the age of eight years old. It is likely that Frost himself employed home burial, as his family lived in rural New England. This experience would bring significant strain to him and his wife’s marriage, inspiring the events of Home Burial.

Home Burial uses strong imagery to show the tension between Amy and her husband. The poem is told in the form of a conversation between the husband and wife. As such, Frost’s description of the character’s actions, feelings, and movements helps give the reader an insight into the characters beliefs, thoughts, and the nature of their relationship. Both characters are suffering from the loss of their young son, but how they grieve differently is the main cause of the conflict between them. The character’s action are full of meaning; from how the husband buries his son, Amy’s reactions to her husband, and the graveyard imagery used.

At the beginning of the poem, when the husband notices Amy looking out through the window, he asks, “What is it you see?” The poem then describes the husband begin mounting up the stairs as Amy cowers. This gives the reader insight into the relationship between the husband and wife. He is shown as the oppressor, and she as the oppressed (Little 111). The husband completely overpowers and subdues his wife, telling Amy to declare what she sees, instead of phrasing it in the form of a question. “I will find out now, you must tell me dear,” the husband declares as he makes his way up the stairs. When he realizes that Amy is looking out at the mound, Amy pleads with the husband to stop. The husband’s powerful posturing, such as putting his knuckles to his chin, betray his true feelings. He himself is suffering greatly from the loss of his child, saying “Let me into your grief. I’m not so much unlike other folks as your standing there apart would make me out.” The husband’s aggressive body language and angry demeanor is simply how he expresses his grief.

Amy on the other hand grieves very differently. The image of the husband burying their dead child weighs heavily on Amy’s mind. The reader is given insight into this through her description of how she sees the burial happen. “I saw you from that very window there, Making the gravel leap and leap in air, Leap up, like that, like that, and land so lightly And roll back down the mound beside the hole. I thought, Who is that man? I didn’t know you.” To Amy the husband buried their child with little to no feeling. He does the act in a matter of fact fashion, which to Amy seems almost inhuman. His words after the burial only serve to condemn him further in her mind, “Three foggy mornings and one rainy day will rot the best birch fence that a man can build.” While the husband is speaking metaphorically about how time (the rain) destroys all of man’s accomplishments (his son), Amy takes him to be speaking literally about a fence. This infuriates her, as she feels as though the husband doesn’t care about the death of their son. What she doesn’t understand is that he is grieving in his own way. This inability to understand each other is what drives the conflict between the two characters (Faggen 128).

In summation, the poem Home Burial uses the setting and imagery in order to develop the relationship between Amy and the husband. The rural New England setting is important, because the tradition of home burial is what initially exposes the differences between Amy and the husband. Amy is implied to be a foreigner, and thus she is not as intimately familiar with death as her husband. This difference is one of the reasons that the characters are unable to acknowledge the others form of grieving. Frost’s descriptions of the husband gives the reader insight into how he grieves. Unlike Amy, the husband does not overly exhibit emotion or talk about his pain. His pain is shown through his anger and physically imposing demeanor. The inability to understand each other is the main failure in their relationship. Robert Frost does an amazing job of bringing the reader into the intimate lives of these two characters through good use of setting and exquisite use of imagery.

Works Cited

Burns, Allen. The Thematic Guide to American Poetry. Greenwood Press, 2002. 90-94. Print.

Faggen, Robert. Robert Frost:The Challenge of Darwin. University of Michigan Press, 1997. 215-245. Print.

Little, Michael. How to Write: About Robert Frost. Bloom’s Literary Criticism, 2010. 100- 114. Print.

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The World of the Child in a Rural Setting in the Poem “Out, Out”

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

Throughout ‘Out, Out’, Frost utilises a multitude of techniques in order to express the thoughts, feelings and poignancy of a young child and the rural idyll he inhabits. The exploration of this important theme, and the injection of subtle vocabulary, allegory and syntax it entails, is of paramount importance to Frost and he treats it with according lustre. Throughout the poem Frost conjures a bleak and wholly malicious image of innocence being overwhelmed by the adult, and industrial, world: a theme prevalent throughout a large proportion of his poems.

From the start of the poem, Frost immediately creates a sense that the rural idyll is being entreated upon by an evil being: industry. For example: “And the buzz saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled.” The repetition contained within this excerpt, obviously, is a suitable method of conveying the relentlessness of the buzz saw, but it is its positioning that strikes the reader: it is located after a brief passage of Frost eloquently describing the surrounding scenery: “Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it…under the sunset far into Vermont.” This quotation helps to juxtapose rural life with industrial and is also, obviously, allegorical for the boy’s life being ended by the saw.

However, Frost also explores ulterior themes that underlie the majority of the poem. For example, on numerous occasions, it seems that Frost, using the events that unfold throughout the course of the poem, is commenting upon the altogether naivety and short-sightedness of farmers in rural America: “From there those that lifted eyes could count five mountain ranges.” This quotation particularly shows Frost making a profound and subtle inference on the fact that farmers do not appreciate the staggering beauty that surrounds them and nature as an entity, they merely destroy it. Another example of this theme rising to the surface is: “No one believed.” This extract shows the pure stupidity of those that surround the child and the generic ignorance of the rural world when encouraging industry. Quotations similar to those above also create a deep sense of empathy within the reader and an abject dislike of the adults: a factor that greatly increases the emotional involvement of the reader within the poem and the successfulness of the piece.

Vocabulary and syntax are also technical protagonists in conveying the aforementioned themes; for example, Frost incites a superior level of emotion by using simple childish phrases and words: “Big boy doing a man’s job.” This quotation highlights the ridiculousness of the tasks given to the boy and how he is being forced to ‘grow up’ and that how adults are stealing his blissful innocence, just as, ultimately, industry is stealing the rural life: a characteristic Frostian technique. It seems, however, that Frost’s primary concern when selecting vocabulary was to emphasise the brevity of the child’s existence, for example, the extraction of the title from the Shakespearian quotation: “Out, Out-brief candle.” This again, reiterates the purity of youth and the underlying callousness of man’s heart, but also makes reference to the seemingly insignificance of life in general: “No more to build on there.”

Continuation is also an important theme throughout the poem. Often expressed through the vulgarity of the adults and industry, it proves to be an instigator of undeniable emotion within the reader and, most importantly, highlights the unpleasant and mediocre existence of the child: “And they, since they were not the ones dead, turned to their affairs.” This quotation presents the vast chasm, in which no love or respect lingers, between adult and child and how the parents do not see the death of their son as tragic, but merely as a decrease in their economic potential: this is made even more prevalent by the mysterious absence of the parents of the boy. This extremely morbid comment on the farcical and unsubstantial morals of the adult world almost certainly had personal resonances within Frost.

The actual event of the cutting of the arm is complexly expressed by Frost using an advanced myriad of techniques. Imagery, however, is what initially strikes the reader: “As if to prove saws knew what supper meant.” This personification of the saw shows an ulterior intelligence within the mechanisms of industry: it is almost like willfully destroying a human life. The metaphoric ‘meeting’ of saw with flesh is also profound: “He must have given the hand. However it was, neither refused the meeting.” This implies that the boy has suicidal tendencies, but also, allegorically, shows a willful merging of two contrasting ways of life.

Despite the initial appearance of the poem as simplistic and even uninteresting, when one digs deeper into the pile of literary techniques cast into the poem by Frost a wholly different piece begins to unfurl slowly: a comment appropriate to most of his other works.

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Literary Analysis Of The Road Not Taken By Robert Frost

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

In this essay I will be looking for examples of poetic devices such as theme, imagey and tone, in the poem created by Robert Frost ‘The Road Not Taken’. As a literary device, the theme of a poem lies in the meaning of the story it tells.It is the central topic or idea explored in a text. Usually the theme of a work of literature can be stated in one word, such as “love” or“sadness”. A poem or text can have more than one theme. The theme is not stated explicitly in the text, but instead is expressed through the characters’ actions, words, and thoughts. This is an excellent example of theme in the poem ‘Road Not Taken’. This is an ambiguous poem that allows the readers to think about choices they make in life. Robert Frost’s work The Road Not Taken conveys a very simple, yet pensive theme. The poem describes the problems and choices one must take in life, and how those specific decisions impact that person. Frost establishes this theme with a depiction of two paths in the woods. Later in the poem, the author reveals the attributes and personality of the main character as he or she ponders past life choices. This characterization helps to bridge the gap between the reader and the character, allowing the poem to communicate a deeper meaning. Frost strengthens the reader’s figurative presence in the poem by presenting such diction and setting of two roads. The use of such devices again add to the connection between the reader and the character-forcing Frost’s message to become even more insightful.

Another literary aspect Frost utilizes to express his tone in setting. In the poem, he states, “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood…”. The phrase “a yellow wood” may be a symbolism of the color the trees radiated. This suggests that the story takes place in the middle of autumn, most likely, contributing to the sense that time is running out-as in life-for the character. Here, Frost again outlines his tone as he demonstrates the character’s rational contemplation and, eventually, regret. The author further establishes the setting as, in the second stanza, it states, “Then took the other, as just as fair, / And having perhaps the better claim, / Because it was grassy and wanted wear…”. In this section of the poem, it almost seems as if the character unexpectedly wanted life to desire him or her to enter it, as the poem suggests the grass wanted to be worn down. This is probably one of the reasons why the character feels a sense of regret later in the work. Again, Frost communicates his solemn and contemplative tone by familiarizing the reader with the character’s experiences.

As a result, it can be said that Poetic devices are tools that a poet can use to create or enhance a poem’s meaning, or intensify a mood or feeling. These devices help piece the poem together.

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The Human Dilemma To Give Up The Idea Of Giving Up

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

The Road Not Taken is one of Frost’s most popular and most familiar poems. It is made up of four stanzas of five lines each, and each line has between eight and ten syllables in an iambic rhythm, the lines in each stanza rhyme in an ABAAB pattern. This poem tells the story of a man who is on a walk through a forest and comes upon from in the road, he observes that one that one path is worn one that the other, but decides to take on the more rough and untouched. He then reflects on the future, baling that this course will change the course of his life. He will later look back and reflect on all the changes. This is my favorite poem from this unit largely because of the simplicity of its symbolism: The speaker must choose between diverging paths in a wood, and he sees that choice as a metaphor for choosing between different directions in life. A major universal truth is easily and uniquely presented in way that captivates the audience with its great imagery and simple metaphors.

The most prevalent figure of speech in the poem is the metaphor as the whole poem itself is a large metaphor for the decisions one takes in life. The speaker comes at a cross roads between two roads and debates on which road to take, the roads in this situation represent the decisions a person has to take in life. The roads are also a metaphor for the individualism needed in life. The speaker shows how they went the opposite way as most people on a decision and how that has changed them forever. This metaphor helps the reader become aware that the speaker is expressing individualism and is thinking about how their life would be changed if he chose differently. One time the speaker shows individualism is when they say how they chose where to go. After the traveler reaches the fork, they must decide which one to take. There was one that was worn down and one that was starting to grow wild. ‘Then took the other, as just as fair, /and having perhaps the better claim, / because it was grassy and wanted wear’. This part of the poem is describing how the speaker wants to be different from everyone else. The traveler chooses the path or the decision that takes him as far away from everyone else because the path was less traveled. The speaker wanted to be different so they went to opposite way as everyone else and pull of an easy travel.

The main theme of the ‘The Road Not Taken’ is that it is impossible to see where a major life decision will lead. Because no one knows what the consequences of major life decisions it is better to just do them swiftly and with confidence. It is normal to reflect on what other life could have been obtained if other road, the road not taken, was the road chosen. But to contemplate this hypothetical is deeply unnecessary, for it is impossible to say whether taking the other road would have been better or worse: all one can say is that it would have been different.

Even though this poem was written more than a 100 year ago it still presents ideas that are relevant in today’s world. There are many times when we come to a fork in the road of our lives and we must decide which path is best for us. Even though life decisions will have to be made and roads chosen, the road we choose will determine the kind of person we are and the life we will lead. Once choices are made you can’t you go and undo them, that is why it is important to think what kind of person you wish to become. You can choose to follow everyones else’s lead and go the same path or be different and choose and choose the path no one has taken before. Even then you will always go back and reflect on your past choices wandering what you could have done different. The poem also serves to inform its reader that making a decision is not about shaping your finger and being done with it, it is about knowing what is right for you and what will help you achieve more in life.

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Research Paper: Personal Experiences Of Robert Frost In His Poems

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

Robert Frost said, “In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on.” Through the life in which he went through, Frost has learned a lot, such as the value of things and been through a lot, such as the deaths of many of his family members. All his personal experiences have put him through a lot of grief and helped form the way in which he views life and have a greater appreciation for it.

His writing reflects what he learned and all of his experiences. Robert frost became the poet he is through his early life, his later life, and his poems reflect it. Robert Frost’s life experiences have led him to his career of a poet and becoming one of the best of all time. He was born March 26, 1874 in San Francisco and when he was 11 years old, his father died. As stated by Parini, “This causes the Frost family to move to Massachusetts where his grandparents cared for him and his family” (Parini, 2015, p.5). Frost graduated high school as the valedictorian and heads to college. He had only gone for one semester when he had to return home to support his family. Robert Frost always had a love for English and writing, and with his experiences and view on life, he began to write poetry.

“On November 8, 1894, Frost’s first poem, “My Butterfly”, was published in the New York Independent”. He received $15 (approximately $400 today) from this poem and realized that that would be the start of his career as a poet. Knowing that he wanted to become an English major and a successful poet, Robert Frost did all that he could to make his dreams come true. He was accepted at Harvard and attended for two years studying Liberal Arts, but he had to drop out before he could receive his degree because he needed to support his growing family. Frost had a wife and new son at home while his wife was pregnant with a baby girl. He moved his family to a farm for work in order to pay for medication for his son who was very ill, but his son died before his fourth birthday. Frost had four other children and decided to sell his farm for the money and become a professor. This gave him more time to write and he started to publish books of his poems and dialogues. Frost won his first Pulitzer award in 1923 followed by his second, third, and many other poetry awards.

According to an article by Poetry Foundation, “One of his most memorable moments was having the opportunity of reading at the inauguration of John F. Kennedy where he recited his poem ‘The Gift Outright’”. Overall, he lived his life with many ups and downs, but he got passed all his challenges through his writing. All of Robert Frost’s poems reflect his life experiences and how he views life altogether. Some of the common themes in Frost’s poems include duty, isolation, nature, and everyday life. In his first published poem, “My Butterfly”, Frost is speaking of the death of his butterfly and the sorrow he feels without it. According to Holland, “The parallel Frost draws between the butterfly and himself suggests Frost’s own dissatisfaction and sorrow”.

Holland later discusses that the butterfly could possibly be Frost’s father and how the death of him led to his sadness and melancholy. In “The Sound of Tree”, Frost is talking about being isolated from his community and having to make a decision between what he wants and doing what he has to. As a tree, he knows he must stay, for the roots are the support of all. This poem represents his time of having to leave his dreams often in order to support his family. Another one of his most famous poems, “Nothing Gold Can Stay”, Frost is showing themes of nature and everyday life. “He finds a way to make significant observations about the things in life that we often take for granted,” so in this poem, he reflects his entire view on life and how important it is to love life because soon it will be gone. All of Robert Frost’s poems are still famous today because he uses universal themes, which is why he is such an amazing poet.

Robert Frost lived a very successful life with some of the greatest poems ever written, and he is still remembered today for them from his early life, to later life, and how his poems reflect it. His early life with traumatic events and hard work were just the start of his amazing career. His later life gave him more freedom to write and life experiences to write about while he received many awards for all his works. All that he went through helped him to write the things he did and write the way he did which gave him all his fame and acknowledgement. Even with Robert Frost’s death, his poems will forever live on for they have universal themes and can appeal to all; he truly was one of the greatest poets.

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How Robert Frost’s Poems Reflected His Life: Research Paper

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

Robert Frost is one of America’s greatest poets. He was born on March, 26 1874 and died January 29, 1963. He wrote several books in England as an American author. He suffered from depression and had several occurrences of death and crisis in his life, that he wrote about. He was alive during both world wars. He wrote poems about each war, one being “soldier” written about his friend edward thomas who died due to a shell burst in france during World War I. He wrote mainly about nature and things he saw or experienced. Robert Frost wrote more than ten books that were published and a lot of other poems that were not published.

Robert Frost’s poems reflect his life because of his family’s deaths and crisis, how it resembles his life through his reflection of nature, and his symbolism on certain things such as “the Mending Wall” and “the Road not Taken”. Robert Frost’s dad, William Prescott Frost jr. a journalist for the San Francisco Bulletin, died of tuberculous on May 5, 1885 when Robert Frost was just eleven years old. Robert Frost’s mother, Isabelle Moodie, suffered from depression at an early age that progressed through her later life. Robert Frost’s mother developed breast cancer and went through chemotherapy successfully, she died of heart failure days later in 1900. Robert Frost met his wife, Elinor White, when he attended Lawrence high school. Robert Frost had 6 children before his wife died of a heart attack in 1938. There first son, Elliot Frost, died of cholera before his fourth birthday. Robert Frost’s second child, Lesley Frost Ballantine, was born in 1900 and had no real problems and out lived frost the first of two children to out live Frost. Robert Frost wrote a poem to Lesley Frost called “The Last Word of A Blue Bird, ” this poem is Robert telling his daughter Lesley that her bird was migrating for the winter and that she should not feel bad because her bird will come back and sing in the spring. Robert says in this poem that “he came down To tell Lesley (will you?) That her little Bluebird Wanted me to bring word That the north wind last night That made the stars bright And made ice on the trough Almost made him cough His tail feathers off He just had to fly! But he sent her Good-by, ” Robert Frost’s third child, Carol Frost, was born in 1902 and became a poet. In 1940, Carol Frost committed suicide because he felt he would not be as great of a poet as his dad. Robert Frost’s fourth child, Irma Frost, developed a mental illness and was committed to a mental hospital she was the second of the two Frost children to out live Robert Frost. Robert Frost’s fifth child was born in 1905, Marjorie Frost, died in her 20s during childbirth.

Robert Frost’s sixth and last child, Elinor Bettina Frost, was born on June 20, 1907 and died the next day on June 21, 1907. Robert Frost wrote a poem called “Home Burial” in 1914 in which he states “Can’t a man speak of his own child he’s lost?” which is talking about his son Elliot’s death. Robert Frost developed depression and it worsened as each child died. He later needed prostate surgery, which was successful, and then died of heart failure on January 29, 1963. Robert Frost mentions his depression subtly in his poem “Into My Own” where he says “To overtake me, who should miss me here And long to know if still I held them dear. They would not find me changed from him they knew — Only more sure of all I thought was true. ” Frost says “to overtake me who should miss me here”, in this he is contemplating if he is really worth anything or if anyone would actually miss him if he died. He then says “who longs to know if still I hold them dear, ” he is saying who longs, or has a strong desire, to know if he still cares about anyone. Robert says “they would not find me changed from he they knew, ” he is saying that he is the same person everyone knew him as but he was struggling. William Pritchard states that “Robert Frost felt compelled to respond to earthshaking world events like the dropping of the atomic bomb. ” This is said because Robert Frost wrote a poem called “A Soldier” which is about a fallen soldier. Robert Frost is trying to get you to focus not on that the soldier died, but rather what he died for.

Robert frost has another poem called “Out, Out” which is basically a poem about Robert Frost witnessing a little kid accidently cutting off his hand with a power saw and ended up dying. Robert Frost tended to write poems based on nature he experienced. Robert Frost lived and grew up in Massachusetts with his mother after his dad died. Robert frost moved to New Hampshire in 1900 to take up farming. Frost wrote a book called “New Hampshire” which is his longest poem and its all of his thoughts that he experienced in his time in New Hampshire.

Robert Frost has a poem titled “The Pasture” in which he talks about a farmers duties on the farm, this is a reflection of his duties as a farmer. Robert Frost moved to England and published 2 books. Robert Frost published “A Boy’s Will” and “North Of Boston” while he is in England. Robert Frost moved back to New Hampshire before the start of World War I. Robert Frost spent 40 years of his life as an unknown poet until he returned back home from England. When Robert Frost returned to New Hampshire he settled on another farm. Robert Frost then moves to Vermont and buys a second farm. He then moves back to Massachusetts and lives out the rest of his life until he dies. Robert Frost’s likes writing about nature, he has a poem titled “Stopping By The Woods on a Snowy Evening” in which he describes beautiful woods that he wishes he could admire longer, but has other obligations to adhere to. Robert Frost tended to write about rural landscapes, due to him living on farms in rural places, and use various symbols to associate nature to a part of everyday life. Robert Frost talks about a time when a bird would sing every morning on his porch and he wishes that it would just go away. He tries clapping to scare it off, when he has had enough of this singing, but that would not always work. He then says that he is partly faulted, and that had nothing to do with the birds tone or song. He then says there has to be something wrong with him if he wants to silence any song. This is all mentioned in the poem “A Minor Bird” written back on his farm in New Hampshire.

Robert Frost wrote “Sitting By a Bush in Broad Sunlight” which is about him literally sitting by a bush on a sunny day which he got the inspiration for this poem. Robert Frost uses a lot of symbolism in his writings. In the poem “The Road not Taken” Robert Frost talks about decisions he had to make in life. He says that there are two roads that forked out and he felt bad he couldn’t walk both paths. He stood and looked at both roads for a while and looked to see how far he could see down each path. He picks a path, that looked just as good as the other one, that is in need of some wear because it is grassy and a little overgrown. He says that the paths are really no different than each other, other than one being a little more overgrown than the other. He says he took the road less travelled and that it made all the difference. The symbolism here is there is always a “road” taken when making a decision, good or bad, and that it makes a difference in a person’s life significantly, and makes them think what would have happened if they chose the other road instead.

Another symbolic Robert Frost poem is “Mending Wall. ” This poem is about to neighbors who have a wall separating their properties. The speaker says that “something there is that does not love a wall” meaning that something out in the country does not like the fact there is a wall. This something always freezes the ground and makes the ground and wall swell causing the top rocks, or boulders, of the wall tumbling to the ground. The speaker and his neighbor have to get together every spring and just walk up and down their sides of the wall checking for parts of the wall that need mending. They repair the wall to where there is not a single stone left on the ground because it was put back onto the wall. The speaker tries explaining to the neighbor that he is an apple farmer and that the neighbor grows pine trees, the speaker says that the apples will not be on his side and that they will not affect his pine tree growth. The neighbor will not listen to what the speaker has to say and instead says “good fences make good neighbors”. The speaker then gets the idea to mess with the neighbor by thinking of questions to ask him like “why do fences make good neighbors? Is that not applied to only when cows are present? There are no cows here”. The speaker is then contemplating, while building the wall, what is he “walling in or walling out” because something out there obviously does not like this wall. There are three different types of symbolism in this poem one being a shared obligation. The speaker believes that there is no real point in even having this wall in the first place. The speaker also does not like the phrase “good fences make good neighbors” used by the neighbor. The speaker just feels he has to mend the wall because his neighbor demands the wall to be mended, so the speaker shares responsibility in mending the wall.

The second type present is the idea of being seperate or having separation, this is what seems to be the stance of the neighbor. The neighbor also sees no practical use for this wall in terms of keeping out cattle, sheep, chickens or other livestock. The neighbor is very insistent that the wall be there to divide the land, and that it should be mended every spring. The neighbor repeats “good fences make good neighbors” and it works because the wall sets a boundary that will, in turn, prevent any misunderstandings or any other type of skirmish between the two neighbors. The third symbolism is just that the wall itself can just symbolize the type of neighbors they are to each other in terms of their relationship with each other. The speaker thinks that him and his neighbor have nothing in common besides mending the wall together every spring. While they might only mend the wall they may, in a way, try and work together and keep their relationship as neighbors well and good. This mending of the wall gives the two a chance to just work together to accomplish the same goal, in turn making them better neighbors. The last symbolic poem going to be used is “Stopping By The Woods On a Snowy Evening”.

This is a poem about someone stopping by woods on a snowy evening, hints the title, and admiring the scene. He says the owner of the house located in the woods will not see him stop to watch his woods fill with snow on this evening. The speaker says his horse is queer, confused, as to why they are stopping when there is not a “farmhouse” anywhere around them. The speaker then says “the woods are lovely dark and deep, and that he has promises he has to keep and many more miles to go before he goes to sleep”. The symbolism in this poem is a little easier to see or understand. The speaker stops to admire these beautiful woods being covered in snow one evening. He wishes he can stay all night then realizes that he has promises to keep. These promises being fairly important obligations he has to take care of, so he can not stay. In the poem Frost says “miles to go before i go to sleep”. The miles being experiences in life everyone experiences, Frost is saying he wish he could stay but there are other experiences he has to go through before he “goes to sleep”. Robert frost says miles to go before he goes to sleep, so he has experiences he has left to enjoy, or hate, before he “goes to sleep”. He uses this “go to sleep” as a symbol or metaphor for death, he is saying there are other experiences left in his life before he “goes to sleep”, or dies.

Robert Frost will forever be one of America’s greatest poets. He had that unique writing style of England and North American authors while also writing stuff he saw or experienced. He had a lot of struggles to deal with including the frequent death of family members and his depression. He enjoyed writing about nature and just stuff around him simplistic yet intricate. He also enjoyed the implied symbolism or the thought of symbolism people had about his poems. This is all how Robert Frost’s poems reflected his life through death and crises, nature, and symbolism whether he intended it or not.

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